Iced Turmeric Latte

WRITTEN BY ROCHELLE BILOW

If you’re not seeing turmeric everywhere, you’re either living under a rock or are very good at getting out stains (seriously, that stuff makes everything yellow). We’re fans of the vibrant, healthful spice, and the evidence is in our newest recipe for an ice-cold, just-sweet-enough, non-dairy turmeric latte.

The latte calls for cashew milk, freshly grated turmeric, and palm sugar. The ingredients are worth searching for; they make it taste extra-special. But if you’re all, “Oh hell no, there is no way I’m finding fresh turmeric root at my supermarket” we’ve got you. Here are three ways to customize this *highly Instagrammable* drink.

Basic
Instead of palm sugar, use a liquid sweetener, like honey or maple syrup (granulated sugar won’t dissolve in cold liquid). Just mix the sweetener into a glass of milk (any dairy or alt-milk your heart desires) with a teaspoon each of ground ginger and ground turmeric. Stir it all together and pour over ice.

Better
Cashew milk has a luxurious, creamy texture thanks to its high fat content, which makes it an obvious choice for an upgrade. But it has another benefit: It plays well with a squeeze of lemon juice, which helps brighten the drink. If you can’t find cashew milk, you can use another milk, bearing in mind that citrus will make dairy milk curdle. Use your favorite liquid sweetener and the ground turmeric/ginger combo. Bonus points if you have ground cardamom—add a pinch of that in, too; it will add a subtle perfumey fragrance to the drink.

Baller
Digital associate food editor Rick Martinez developed our recipe with fresh turmeric and ginger, because just-ground spices (technically, they’re both roots) have a much more intense flavor. Use a microplane zester to grate them into store-bought or homemade cashew milk. Word to the wise: Wear latex gloves to guard your fingers against stains. Use 4 teaspoons of turmeric and 1 teaspoon ginger for 1 cup of cashew milk. Martinez loves the floral sweetness of palm sugar, which is sold in bricks or blocks, so he grates 2 teaspoons of that into the cashew milk. If you can’t find palm sugar, you can substitute raw sugar, as it will be strained, leaving behind any granules or grit. Stir it all together with a teaspoon of fresh lemon juice and a pinch each of sea salt and cardamom. Let it steep for 5 minutes so the flavors infuse, then strain out the solids. Serve over ice with a lemon wedge.

Not for nothing, but this super-healthy latte is also delicious heated up.

Ingredients

SERVINGS: MAKES 1

  • 1 cup cashew milk
  • 4 teaspoons finely grated fresh turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated palm sugar or raw sugar
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 pinches of ground cardamom
  • Pinch of flaky sea salt
  • Lemon wedge (for serving)

Preparation

  • Whisk milk, turmeric, palm sugar, ginger, lemon juice, cardamom, and salt in a small bowl until sugar and salt have dissolved; let sit 5 minutes to let flavors meld. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a measuring cup, pressing on solids to extract juices; discard solids.
  • Fill a glass with ice. Pour latte over and serve with lemon wedge.

 

 

Recipe by Rick Martinez

Photograph by Alex Lau

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I. Have made. Butter! (and it was super easy)

I was thinking about what I could eliminate from my grocery list. I’ve been making breakfast and dinner recipes from 100 Days of Real Food and The Fresh 20 that are delicious as well as full of awesome micronutrients. The past month has been chock full of yummy, healthy meals and that has inspired me to take the next step.

My mother lives with us now and is a butter addict. Well, she’s actually a toast addict, who uses butter as lubricant. We had already switched from “spreads” like country crock to real butter, but I wondered if we couldn’t take it one step further and make my own. That way I know exactly how it was made and can choose cream from the local farmers market to make the butter. About two years ago I had insisted we stop using margarine because butter tastes much better, it’s a natural product that human beings have been eating and cooking with for centuries without ­damaging their health, and I trust cows more than food product scientists.

So why on earth did I ever use margarine, a highly synthetic and unpleasant-tasting concoction laced with additives and cheap, low-grade oils refined on an industrial scale? Propaganda. My parents had been fed “the propaganda” since the mid-80s, and I grew up on that funny Parkay commercial that made me trust the creamy yellow stuff that came in tubs. Plus it was easier to spread.

In February 2013 the unholy alliance of Government nutritionists and the food processing industry were exposed in a study of Australian men and subsequent meta-studies of the health consequences of consuming food products like margarine. If they hadn’t lied — and margarine really was better for you, as they’ve been claiming for decades — you’d expect the middle-aged Australian men who switched to safflower oil to live longer and have better health outcomes.

The exact opposite turned out to be true. Those men who ate more of the safflower-derived products were almost twice as likely to die from all causes, including heart disease.

So, butter is better! Plus it’s easy to make:

1. Take a pint of cream and pour it into a mixing bowl.
2. Use a handheld mixer and whip the cream on high until the creamy yellow soft butter separates from the buttermilk. Takes about 5 minutes.
3. Pour 1 cup of ice cold water and pour it over the butter and buttermilk. Mix it for about 1 minute.
4. Spoon it all into a fine strainer or cheesecloth and press or squeeze out the water and buttermilk.
5. Spoon the resulting butter into a butter-keeper or bowl.
6. Savor your 1/2 pound of butter.

That’s it. Super simple and tasty. Enjoy.

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Urban Farmers are my Heroes

Luke Keegan started with eight raised beds (6′x4′) with reclaimed redwood from a barn. The Dervaes family started much the same way.

For over a decade, the Dervaes family have proved that growing your own food can be sustainable, practical, successful and beautiful even in an urban area. they harvest 3 tons of organic food annually from their 1/10 acre garden while incorporating many back-to-basics (permaculture) practices, solar energy, and biodiesel in order to reduce their footprint on the earth’s resources.

Read about them here: http://urbanhomestead.org/

Keegan started his very own garden of Eden on his small front lawn in the busy port city of Oakland, California. He has given me the inspiration I’ve been looking for. Keegan posted what he calls Operation “ the Lawn” to the photo sharing network Imgur, sharing the story of how he replaced his drab lawn with a flourishing edible garden!

Read his story here: http://imgur.com/a/JihrB?gallery

 

If they can do it, I can do it 🙂

Glam Girl Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

Med u saću

Ingredients:

1 tsp ground spices (her grinder contained: sea salt, mustard seeds, black peppercorns, coriander, onion, garlic, paprika, and chilli pepper)

1 tblsp apple cider vinegar

1 tblsp water

2 tblsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp honey

2 tsp Dijon mustard

2 tsp yogurt

(yields aprx 6 tablespoons of dressing)

Method:

Combine all ingredients and shake/stir. After chilling for 30 mins its ready. Pour it onto a mason jar salad 🙂

From: http://purposefulbeauty.blogspot.com/2013/01/mustard-vinagarette.html

Glam Fruit Salad with Poppy Seed Dressing

Close-up of fruit salad

Close-up of fruit salad (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 I found this healthy recipe in a copy of Heart Insight Magazine. Enjoy!
      Salad Dressing Ingredients:
      3/4 cup 100% cranberry juice
      1 teaspoon cornstarch
      1 tablespoon sugar
      1 teaspoon grated peeled gingerroot
      1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest (optional)
      1/2 teaspoon poppy seeds
      Salad Ingredients:
      2 cups cubed watermelon
      1 cup whole strawberries, quartered
      1/2 cup green grapes, halved
      1/2 cup blueberries

DIRECTIONS: In a small saucepan, stir together the juice and cornstarch until the cornstarch dissolves.

Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Boil for 1 minute. Pour into a shallow bowl and refrigerate until completely cooled, about 10 minutes. Stir in the remaining dressing ingredients. Meanwhile, arrange the salad ingredients on salad plates. Spoon the dressing on top.

Serves 6; heaping 3/4 cup fruit and 2 tablespoons dressing per serving

Minutes to Prepare: 15 – Minutes to Cook: 10

 

Pasta and Tennessee

My SweetHusband is having problems digesting meat. He has noticed a big change in stomach pains since he had his gallbladder removed. As much as he is a middle Tennessee ridge-runner-meat-and-potatoes guy, he came up with the idea of cutting out all meat for a month and then slowly adding it back in to see what the culprit really is.

So, we’ve been doing plant-based meals with seafood thrown in here and there and sure enough, he hasn’t had any problems. Except, of course, on “cheat days” when he has steak, or a burger. Ahem.

I wanted to post the bestpastaever that I whipped up last night and this is exactly the right post to do so.

There were no measurements, just adding the ingredients and tasting until it was right. SweetHubby loved it. I figure the more interesting the meals are, the less he’ll even want to have a “cheat day” and suffer the consequences. The saga continues.

Pasta, sundried tomatoes, fresh organic vine-ripened tomatoes, greek EV olive oil, feta cheese, basil, sea salt, freshly cracked pepper. Delish!

Pasta, sundried tomatoes, fresh organic vine-ripened tomatoes, greek EV olive oil, feta cheese, basil, sea salt, freshly cracked pepper. Delish!

Fruity Immunity Boosting Smoothie

This rosy pink smoothie is deceptively yummy, from the taste alone you might underestimate the powerful dose of vitamins and antioxidants contained within. The vitamin A from the carrots and vitamin C from the oranges and strawberries support your immune system, boost eye health, increases your body’s ability to absorb iron, and helps resist infection.

Ingredients: 2 cups raw spinach, 3/4 cup orange juice, 3/4 cup water, 1 banana, 1/4 cup carrots, 2 cups strawberries, 1/2 cup blueberries

Method: Blend spinach, orange juice, and water together first. After that is blended and creamy, add the rest of the ingredients and blend for 1 minute.

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 (via Simple Green Smoothies)

How to Eat Well and Stay Glam

Salad at Lunch

Many of us want to eat better, but don’t know how to start. Making a few small, simple changes to the way you eat can make a large difference. Here are Fleurty’s tips:

  • East a salad every day (loaded with rainbow veggies, avocado, nuts, and seeds)
  • Eat a plant-based dinner once per week (check Vegetarian Times magazine online for tasty simple recipes)
  • Use your herbs and spices! (quality olive oil, ginger, cumin, oregano, and chili all will add depth to flavor)
  • Colors of the wind (eat as many colors of the rainbow as you can, each day)
  • Get your protein from plant-based sources (check out the stats on protein in your veggies, you’ll be surprised, and then you can cut down on that meat you thought you needed today – too much animal protein can be detrimental to your health)

 

Operation Urban Farming: Grow Veggies from Kitchen Leftovers

I’m in love with the tips in Don’t Throw It, Grow It!: 68 windowsill plants from kitchen scraps

The premise? Grow your own veggies from your cutting board remains! 

Grow your own celery from your celery remains. Just chop off the base and plant. One week of growth shown in photo to the right. 

One week of celery growth from https://www.facebook.com/GrowingOrganicEatingOrganic

One week of celery growth. Source:Growing Organic Eating Organic

“Magic and wonder hide in unexpected places — a leftover piece of ginger, a wrinkled potato left too long in its bag, a humdrum kitchen spice rack. In Don’t Throw It, Grow It! Deborah Peterson reveals the hidden possibilities in everyday foods.

Peterson, former president of the American Pit Gardening Society, shows how common kitchen staples — pits, nuts, beans, seeds, and tubers — can be coaxed into lush, vibrant houseplants that are as attractive as they are fascinating. With Peterson’s help, a sweet potato turns into a blooming vine; chickpeas transform into cheery hanging baskets; the humble beet becomes a dramatic centerpiece; and gingerroot grows into a 3-foot, bamboo-like stalk. In some cases the transformation happens overnight!

Don’t Throw It, Grow It! offers growing instructions for 68 plants in four broad categories — vegetables; fruits and nuts; herbs and spices; and more exotic plants from ethnic markets. The book is enhanced with beautiful illustrations, and its at-a-glance format makes it a quick and easy reference. Best of all, every featured plant can be grown in a kitchen, making this handy guide a must-have for avid gardeners and apartment-dwellers alike.” – From Amazon [physical book]: http://amzn.to/TWz2tq [kindle version]: http://goo.gl/dn4P7

Thanks to these friends for the info: https://www.facebook.com/GrowingOrganicEatingOrganic,