Sweet Corn and Chicken Soup

 

Sweet Corn and Chicken Soup – Use leftover chicken, frozen corn, creamed corn in the can….done in 15 minutes!

Ingredients:

2 cans creamed corn, 1 ear of fresh corn (or a 1/2 bag frozen), 3 cups shredded chicken, 2 eggs, 1 liter or 1 carton chicken stock, dash of olive oil, salt, white pepper

Directions:

Sweet Corn Soup Presentation

Sweet Corn Soup Presentation

Warm chicken stock in pot. Add chicken and corn. Bring to light boil. Season with salt and white pepper to taste. Pour in the egg. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat and add a dash of olive oil. Enjoy.

See other easy recipes at http://mykeuken.blogspot.com.au

Glam Girl’s Guide to Clean Eating

Recently, on a trip to visit the in-laws in Tennessee I decided to blog and vlog about clean eating and whole living.

What is Clean Eating??

The crux of clean eating is consuming food in its most natural state, or as close to it as possible. It is not a diet; it’s a lifestyle approach to food and its preparation, leading to an improved life – one meal at a time. 

 

New Orleans: Crescent City Farmers Market, Mag...

New Orleans: Crescent City Farmers Market, Magazine & Girod Streets, Saturday morning. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tips to baby step your way to clean eating:

Eat five to six times a day
Three meals and two to three small snacks. Include a lean protein, plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, and a complex carbohydrate with each meal. This keeps your body energized and burning calories efficiently all day long. Consider patronizing local farmer’s markets and grocery stores.

Drink at least two liters of water a day
Preferably from a reusable container. Limit your alcohol intake to one glass of antioxidant-rich red wine a day.

Get label savvy
Clean foods contain just minimal ingredients. Any product with a long ingredient list is likely highly processed and contains toxins or additives not beneficial for optimal health.

Avoid processed and refined foods
This includes white flour, sugar, bread and pasta. Enjoy complex carbs such as whole grains instead.

Know thy enemies
Steer clear of anything high in saturated and trans fats, anything fried (because it has absorbed a ton of oil) or anything high in sugar.

Shop with a conscience
Consume humanely raised and local meats.

Choose organic whenever possible
If your budget limits you, make meat, eggs, dairy and the Dirty Dozen your organic priorities.

Consume healthy fats
Try to have essential fatty acids, or EFAs, every day.

Learn about portion sizes
Work towards eating within them.

Reduce your carbon footprint
Eat produce that is seasonal and local. It is less taxing on your wallet and our environment.

Slow down and savor
Never rush through a meal. Food tastes best when savored. Enjoy every bite! (We live by this in New Orleans)

Take it to go
Pack a cooler for work or outings so you always have clean eats on the go.

Make it a family affair
Food is a social glue that should be shared with loved ones. Improve the quality of your family’s life along with your own.

(via Clean Eating Magazine, with Fleurty Naturelle input)

DIY Perfume Oil (Roses, Lavender, and Jasmine, Oh My!)

Perfume oils are one of the oldest beauty products known to woman.

Perfume Oils

Perfume Oils (Photo credit: KateWares)

 According to Levey, the world’s first recorded chemist is considered to be a woman named Tapputi, a perfume maker who was mentioned in a cuneiform tablet from the 2nd millennium BC in Mesopotamia. She distilled flowers, oil, and calamus with other aromatics then filtered and put them back in the still several times. The Persian chemist Ibn Sina (also known as Avicenna) introduced the process of extracting oils from flowers by means of distillation, the procedure most commonly used today. He first experimented with the rose. Until his discovery, liquid perfumes were mixtures of oil and crushed herbs or petals, which made a strong blend. Rose water was more delicate, and immediately became popular. The art of perfumery was known in western Europe ever since 1221, evidenced by monks’ recipes of Santa Maria delle Vigne or Santa Maria Novella of Florence, Italy. In the east, the Hungarians produced in 1370 a perfume made of scented oils blended in an alcohol solution at the command of Queen Elizabeth of Hungary, best known as Hungary Water. The art of perfumery prospered in Renaissance Italy, and in the 16th century, Italian refinements were taken to France by Catherine de’ Medici’s personal perfumer, Rene the Florentine (Renato il Fiorentino). His laboratory was connected with her apartments by a secret passageway, so that no formulae could be stolen en route. Thanks to Rene, France quickly became one of the European centers of perfume and cosmetic manufacture. Cultivation of flowers for their perfume essence, which had begun in the 14th century, grew into a major industry in the south of France. From France, perfumery developed into what we know today. To make your own perfume oil (the easiest perfume method):

  • Fill a mason jar with fresh* petals from organically grown flowers (I recommend lavender, jasmine, or rose, mixed with a handful of calendula).
  • Pour almond, grapeseed, or jojoba oil over the petals in the jar. Make sure the petals are completely covered with your chosen oil.
  • Let the jar sit for 12 days in a warm, shaded place.
  • Strain the petals from the oil, and add several drops of vitamin E oil to preserve your perfume.
  • Use lavishly, applying drops of this aromatic oil to your wrists and neck, or as an after-bath moisturizer for your whole body.
  • Pamper yourself. Pour your oil into pretty little bottles, with vintage labels. Give as gifts to share the love.

*For dried petals, see my post on rosewater and vodka based perfume. References:Aftel, Mandy (2004). Essence and Alchemy: A Book of Perfume. Gibbs Smith. pp. 12-19.Levey, Martin (1973). Early Arabic Pharmacology: An Introduction Based on Ancient and Medieval Sources. Brill Archive. pp. 9.

Fleurty Naturelle’s Whole Living Giveaway

Giveaway time! I use my blog to promote clean eating, healthy hair, herbal medicine, and natural beauty so the purpose of this giveaway is the same. The winners will receive either $50 Whole Foods gift card or a $50 Body Shop gift card.

The first phase of this giveaway involves using your Twitter account (if you do not use twitter, see below). To enter, follow me on Twitter @fleurtynaturel and retweet my giveaway announcement:

@fleurtynaturel’s #giveaway! Follow, RT & win a $50 giftcard to @wholefoods or @thebodyshopusa. (Details: http://wp.me/p37FVU-3R)

 The contest will begin on February 15, 2013 and end on March 1, 2013.

If you don’t have Twitter, you can enter via YouTube here (or embedded below). Just watch and follow the directions in the video description.

Let your friends on facebook, tumblr, youtube, and twitter know.

How to Effectively Apply Products to Low Porosity Hair

I’ve written about hair porosity in the past, so now I want to really cover exactly how to apply moisturizers to low-porosity hair effectively.

Curly Nikki says:

Low porosity hair is typically much harder to moisturize since it is more difficult for moisture to penetrate the hair shaft. Prep time is paramount for low porosity curlies. Every step in your daily routine is important and will determine how healthy your hair is. Avoid moisture sapping products, including alcohol based gels, hairspray and mousse.

TIP: Shop for water based, liquid leave in moisturizers that will moisturize without heaviness. Also, make sure to add a natural oil to your regime. Opt for a light to seal your hair after moisturizing. I prefer jojoba oil since it most resembles the sebum produced in our scalp. Heavy oils will be harder to absorb and will simply sit on top of it and weigh it down.

So, my personal Fleurty Naturelle regimen includes these steps for effectively applying products to my low porosity hair:

  • Apply moisturizer to warm, damp hair – use a steamer to get the mositurizer to absorb, apply it in the shower, or apply it and then wear a plastic cap so the naturally escaping heat from your scalp will assist in absorption of the product.
  • Ensure even distribution – use a detangling comb or rake your fingers though each section of hair to make sure its distributed properly over your whole head.
  • Shake or Squeeze – to remove excess product and water and avoide the foamy look 😉
  • Rub it in – When you use a hair butter or curl cream and you have excess product, squeezing and shaking won’t get rid of it. So, smooth it into the strands by using the shingling method (Details/Steps/Photos Here, Video Here).

 

Low Porosity Hair Strand

Low Porosity Hair Strand

All-Natural DIY Multi-Purpose Orange Cleaning Product

orange peel vineger better

Orange peels, vinegar, water, and salt (optional) make an excellent cleaner for the home. Using this simple, natural, DIY cleanser recipe you can eliminate toxin-filled retail cleansers from your pantry.You can clean your counters, stove, sinks, and floors with this! No more worrying about breathing in fumes (or your kids breathing in fumes and touching the toxic residue) when the label warns to “use in a well ventilated area”.

  1. Store your orange peels (in the freezer a little at a time if you like). When you have enough, put them in a glass jar.
  2. Optional step to increase potency: Sprinkle salt (any kind) on the orange peels. This will pull out the oils and make your cleanser stronger. Let sit for 30 minutes. 
  3. Fill the jar up with vinegar and let it sit for 10-14 days (or longer if you forget its waiting for you).
  4. During this time take a photo, bask in the Martha-like glory of DIY house cleanser. 
  5. After 14 days strain the liquid.
  6. Put peels in the garbage…um, composter. (Hey, I’m a work in progress!)
  7. Mix water with the vinegar to a ratio of 2:1 or to a ratio where you like the smell (sometimes it’s very vinegary smelling at 1:1, other times it’s too orange-y at 2:1, so depending on your personal preference and desired strength).
  8. Use and enjoy. Put in a spray bottle for counters, or another jar for multiple-use. *Feel free to add a drop or three of essential oil for a personalized fragrance 🙂

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Mason Jar Salad

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Mason-Jar-Salad-275x270

Fleurty’s New Amazon Store

Support This Site by Using Our Amazon Store :)

Support This Site by Using Our Amazon Store 🙂

To make shopping for the products and ingredients in my blog posts easier, I’m publishing the link to get to my personalized store within Amazon. I’ve found the best value and the best quality with the linked items.

Click Here for Fleurty Naturelle’s Amazon Store and it will open in a new window.

Image representing Amazon as depicted in Crunc...

DIY Luxurious Bath Salts

bath salts

Homemade Bath Salt Recipes!

It’s surprisingly easy to prepare your own blend at home:

In a large bowl, mix to combine: 6 parts coarse sea salt; 3 parts epsom salts, to soothe tired muscles and reduce inflammation; and 1 part baking soda, to soften waters and alleviate skin irritation. Add a few drops of essential oils, and combine. Add a few drops of food coloring, until you achieve the desired shade. If you intend to present the bath salts as gifts, be sure to store them in a stoppered and labeled container to keep out moisture. (from Martha Stewart)